1.Introduction

In most cases there will be a natural transition between deciding what actions are needed and the end of the enquiry, into formalising what these actions are and who needs to be responsible for each action. This is the adult safeguarding plan. A safeguarding plan for an adult is not a care and support plan. It will focus on care provision only in relation to the aspects that safeguard against abuse or neglect, or which offer a therapeutic or recovery based resolution. In many cases the provision of care and support may be important in addressing the risk of abuse or neglect, but where this is the intention the safeguarding plan must be specific as to how this intervention will achieve this outcome. The person may, therefore, have a care and support plan and a safeguarding plan.

2. The Safeguarding Plan

The safeguarding plan should set out:

  • who is the lead – where possible this should be the same person who completed the enquiry;
  • what steps are to be taken to assure the future safety of the adult;
  • how each organisation /practitioner will contribute to the plan;
  • the person’s aims hope and wishes;
  • any adults / carers who are important in protecting the person;
  • contingency plans should the safeguarding plan not achieve its objectives or if the risks to the adult change;
  • any new services / changes to existing services;
  • the provision of any support, treatment or therapy, including ongoing advocacy;
  • any modifications needed in the way services are provided (for example, same gender care or placement or appointment of an Office of the Public Guardian (OPG) deputy);
  • how best to support the adult through any action they may want to take to seek justice or redress;
  • any ongoing risk management strategy as appropriate;
  • arrangements for reviewing the plan if circumstances change or where there is a request to do so from the adult, carer or any involved practitioner.

The safeguarding plan should outline the roles and responsibilities of all individuals and agencies involved, and should identify the Safeguarding Adults Manager who will monitor and review the plan, and when this will happen. Safeguarding plans should be person centred,  outcome focused and made with the full participation of the adult. In some circumstances, it may be appropriate for safeguarding plans to be monitored through ongoing care management responsibilities. In other situations, a specific safeguarding review may be required.

The plan should be updated throughout the enquiry. Timescales for achievements and review should be built into the plan.

It should be recorded and available in a format that is accessible to the adult concerned. It should also be documented in the adult’s case records, as should each change.

It should be agreed who the plan can be shared with and under what circumstances and this should be recorded in the case record.

3. Review of the Enquiry

A review of the enquiry may be optional. The identified Safeguarding Adults Manager lead should monitor the plan on an ongoing basis, within agreed timescales. The purpose of the review is to:

  • evaluate the effectiveness of the safeguarding plan;
  • evaluate whether the plan is meeting / achieving outcomes;
  • evaluate risk.

Reviews of safeguarding plans, and decisions about plans should be communicated and agreed with the adult. Following the review process, it may be determined that:

  • the safeguarding plan is no longer required; or
  • the safeguarding plan needs to continue.

Any changes or revisions to the plan should be made, new review timescales set (if needed) and agreement reached regarding the lead professional, who will continue monitoring and reviewing it. It may also be agreed, if needed, to instigate a new adult safeguarding enquiry (Section 42). New safeguarding enquiries will only be needed when the local authority determines it is necessary. If the decision is that further enquiries would be a disproportionate response to new or changed risks, further review and monitoring may continue.